SuperData released a new report on the US digital games market. Here are the interesting points:

  • There are 287 Million Mobile Active Gamers in the U.S.
  • $1.2 Billion in U.S. digital game sales for December 2014
  • 11% Year over on year growth in December 2014, compared to December 2013
  • 17% Growth in mobile digital revenues
  • 10% Increase in console digital sales
  • 10% Decrease in social game revenues
  • Average spend on PS4 was $11.09, down from $20 in November 2014
  • Average spend on Xbox One was $6.88, down from $21 in November 2014
  • Average spend on Steam was $2.35, down from $8 in November 2014

According to a new study from Insights Meta:

  • 75 percent of players play both F2P and P2P titles
  • Less than 10% of “pay to play” gamers don’t play free-to-play games
  • 28 percent of P2P players spend money on F2P games
  • 20 percent of F2P-exclusive players spend money on F2P games
  • 36 percent of gamers surveyed said they’d downloaded free content on their console
  • 1/3 of all gaming time is spent on F2P games

The full study is available from Insights Meta. There’s also an interactive infographic if you want to check it out.

Thanks to Niko Partners for the translation of the Gamelook.com article that stated:

  • 60-80% of players will abandon a F2P mobile game after one minute if they don’t like the gameplay or design. Here are the top reasons for abandonment:
  • 70 Percent – Monetization appears too quickly, or is overwhelming
  • 45 Percent – Difficulty/output balance
  • 34 Percent – Resources consumed too fast
  • 31 Percent – Poor initial experience
  • 28 Percent – Poor or no reward system

 

SuperDataResearch put out some recent numbers about the digital collectible card game market. Here’s the data:

The audience and revenue numbers are:

  • 53 Million Monthly Active Users (MAU) playing collectible card games ($4.1 Billion in revenue)
  • $2.8 Billion of the revenue is for physical card games (68.3 percent) and $1.3 Billion is related to digital collectible card games (31.7 percent)
  • 18 Million MAU playing collectible card games in the U.S. (1.4 Billion in revenue)
  • 2.5 Million MAU in Germany ($237 Million in revenue)
  • 2.3 Million MAU in the U.K. ($180 Million in revenue)
  • 2 Million in France ($158 Million in revenue
  • 1.8 Million in Russia ($55 Million in revenue)
  • 1.6 Million in Italy ($166 Million in revenue)
  • 1.6 Million in Spain ($154 Million in revenue)
  • 900 Thousand in Poland ($39 Million in revenue)

NOTE: Collectible card games are huge in Japan, however SuperData Research didn’t include any info for the country.

Here are a couple of other bits:

  • 12 Percent of digital collectible card game players convert to paying users in the U.S.
  • Average revenue per paying player in the U.S. is $27, again for digital collectible card games

The Finnish Game Industry is growing at a 39.5 percent growth rate because of some amazing game developers (SuperCell, Rovio, Remedy, (Among others)).

Below is an updated presentation on the market in Finland as well as an outline of opportunities in Finland for anyone looking to start an office there. Of particular note (although not in this presentation) is how Ilkka Paananen and the SuperCell team have deliberately chosen to ensure Finland receives the taxes it is due by not setting up operations in Ireland, the Netherlands Antilles and other tax havens, in order to pay what they owe their country. I applaud this approach to industry development and hope it serves as an example to other companies and countries on how a stand-up company deals with success and helps to build both an ecosystem and industry within a country.

My opinion is that with massive profits and mainstream appeal for many of its games, the Finnish game industry is setup in a way to pay for the development of games that can reach the global audience, but also ensure the industry’s ongoing success. It’s morally righteous and reverent to the local university system (as well as previous commercial entities such as Nokia) which have helped build it, and it appreciates the fact that the universities will continue to be a major part of its growth in the future.

In a world that is often short-sighted, Finland is a leader and their approach is a brilliant example in the post-Montreal economic development era.

According to a new report from GlobalCollect and NewZoo:

  • The global games market is this year expected to reach $70.4 Billion in 2013, an increase of 6% over 2012
  • MMO games will account for $14.9 billion, or 21.2%, of global game revenue in 2013
  • Asia Pacific (APAC) is now the largest games market in the world
  • 34% of global game revenue comes from APAC
  • 64% of MMO revenues now come from APAC
  • The three fastest growing countries in terms of game revenue are Malaysia (121% growth over the past year), Thailand (104% growth) and South Korea (100%  growth)
  • The top 10 countries by average transaction value in video gaming transactions all come from Europe and the Middle East.
  • GlobalCollect predicts:
  • Mobile gaming will grow by more than 35%
  • MMO games market will grow by more than 14%
  • Northern Africa and Central America are emerging hubs for video game fraud

2013 Global MMO Games Market Revenue ($14.9 Billion)

  • North America – $2.5 Billion (5% Growth Rate)
  • EMEA – $2.4 billion (8% Growth rate)
  • Latin America – $500 Million (15% Growth Rate
  • APAC – $9.5 Billion (18% Growth Rate)

2013 Global MMO Players (628 Million)

  • North America – 79 Million
  • EMEA – 208 Million
  • Latin America – 59 Million
  • APAC – 282 Million

Download the full report for free here.

 

According to NPD, 2012 digital game sales were:

  • U.S. -$5.9 billion (40 percent of total U.S. dollars spent on games, up from 28 percent in 2010)
  • U.K. – $1.7 billion
  • Germany – $1.4 billion
  • France – $1 billion.

For 2012, the U.S. breaks down as:

  • New retail games – $7.1 billion
  • Used games – $1.59 billion
  • Digital games and DLC -$2.22 billion
  • Game subscriptions – $1.05 billion
  • Social network games – $544 million
  • Game rentals -$198 million
  • Mobile games -$2.11 billion
  • Digital full games and DLC combined grew 33.9 percent for the year
  • Subscriptions grew 12.9 percent
  • Mobile games grew 10.4 percent
Here are some other random points and findings from the analyst panel at GDC 2013:
  • The UK has the highest percentage of console players
  • France prefers portable consoles
  • Germany prefers computers
  • US is most partial to gaming on mobile and tablet platforms
  • In the US, 27 percent of mobile gamers pay
  • In Europe, 40 percent of mobile gamers pay
  • U.K. average spending on mobile games is $16
  • U.S. average spending on mobile games is $9
  • In China, Mobile game spending is projected to reach$1 billion this year, and $2.8 billion in 2016.

According to SuperData:

  • The European client-based MMO market totalled $1.3 billion in 2012
  • Three publishers dominate the space, generating 70% of all revenue
  • Germany is the largest European client-based MMO market with €474 Million in 2012 sales
  • The UK  client-based MMO market was €281 Million in 2012
  • France was the third largest country in terms of client-based MMO  at €222 Million

In an article on GamesBeat, information was given as to how GREE values mobile installs when determining what to spend on user acquisition.

*In Japan, GREE’s mobile install Lifetime Value (LTV) is around $15
*In the U.S.A., a mobile install is valued between $2-$5
*GREE says they have a 50 percent organic install rate and they tune the amount they are willing to spend on an install accordingly.
*The average install they are paying is in the $2 range according to the article.

Niko Partners released some new data on China’s game market stating that:

  • Browser-based games will grow in China by 41 percent in 2012
  • Client-based MMOGs will continue to generate the majority of revenue in China
  • Webgames and social games will comprise an increasing market share
  • Social games are the most used applications on social networking sites such as Qzone, Pengyou, and RenRen.com
  • The webgames market is fragmented with low barriers to entry yet fewer infrastructure restrictions than the MMOG market