Thanks to Niko Partners for the translation of the Gamelook.com article that stated:

  • 60-80% of players will abandon a F2P mobile game after one minute if they don’t like the gameplay or design. Here are the top reasons for abandonment:
  • 70 Percent – Monetization appears too quickly, or is overwhelming
  • 45 Percent – Difficulty/output balance
  • 34 Percent – Resources consumed too fast
  • 31 Percent – Poor initial experience
  • 28 Percent – Poor or no reward system

 

SuperDataResearch put out some recent numbers about the digital collectible card game market. Here’s the data:

The audience and revenue numbers are:

  • 53 Million Monthly Active Users (MAU) playing collectible card games ($4.1 Billion in revenue)
  • $2.8 Billion of the revenue is for physical card games (68.3 percent) and $1.3 Billion is related to digital collectible card games (31.7 percent)
  • 18 Million MAU playing collectible card games in the U.S. (1.4 Billion in revenue)
  • 2.5 Million MAU in Germany ($237 Million in revenue)
  • 2.3 Million MAU in the U.K. ($180 Million in revenue)
  • 2 Million in France ($158 Million in revenue
  • 1.8 Million in Russia ($55 Million in revenue)
  • 1.6 Million in Italy ($166 Million in revenue)
  • 1.6 Million in Spain ($154 Million in revenue)
  • 900 Thousand in Poland ($39 Million in revenue)

NOTE: Collectible card games are huge in Japan, however SuperData Research didn’t include any info for the country.

Here are a couple of other bits:

  • 12 Percent of digital collectible card game players convert to paying users in the U.S.
  • Average revenue per paying player in the U.S. is $27, again for digital collectible card games

I’m working on a small research piece regarding digital distribution and would appreciate any help from my game development friends in providing some answers. Here’s a link to a Digital Distribution Channel Survey we created: https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/MDGN6H7

I’ll definitely publish the results here on IESherpa. Any help in filling it out and sharing with your friends is appreciated.

I was looking for some data on Cost Per Install (CPI) for games in Japan and a friend of mine who runs a large studio there sent me this link, a blog post by InMobi that I missed in January. It basically sets out the relative cost of mobile installs worldwide. While it isn’t exclusive to games, we can use it to decipher regional costs. To get started, I went over to one of my favorite CPI sites, MobPartner, to check out their scrolling list of live CPI transactions. If you like to watch CPI bidding, it’s the best place to watch the action. Here are a couple pics to illustrate the CPIs today:

CCSE4KE4K UK

As you can see, Empire: Four Kingdoms is buying a lot of installs and they are ranging in the U.S. between $1.90 and $2.40 and hitting $3.05 in the U.K. I would guess the higher priced acquisition in the U.S. is on a better performing network, or more proven ad channel that provides players that either convert a bit higher, or have a higher Lifetime Value (LTV). You need to balance cost with volume in any acquisition campaign, but that’s probably obvious.

So now let’s dig into the InMobi data. We know that their numbers are not just games, so we need to create a reference point.

U.K. 174 $3.31 3.05
U.S. 100 $1.90 $1.75
       
160.5      

The 174 is a number from InMobi on the relative cost per install in the U.K. related to the U.S. Since we know what Goodgame Studios is paying for their users we know the numbers in bold to be true. The InMobi numbers don’t quite match up yet. The difference is 160.5 instead of 174, which is roughly 92.2 percent of the difference. I broke down the numbers with the Relative CPI (R CPI), the Adjusted Relative CPI (AR CPI) and came up with the Actual Game CPI (AG CPI) below. It looks about right to me in terms of acquisition costs. I hope it’s helpful for you too.

Country R CPI AR CPI AG CPI
U.K. 174 160  $  3.05
Australia 127 117  $  2.22
U.S. 100 92  $  1.90
New Zealand 95 88  $  1.66
Malaysia 87 80  $  1.52
South Korea 84 77  $  1.47
Vietnam 84 77  $  1.47
Japan 81 75  $  1.42
Hong Kong 77 71  $  1.35
France 75 69  $  1.31
Singapore 71 65  $  1.24
China 60 55  $  1.05
Germany 56 52  $  0.98
India 40 37  $  0.70

 

 

 

A lot of people ask me how I keep up on so many markets and so many apps around the world. The short inspirational answer is I read a lot because I’m genuinely interested in emerging markets, new gameplay systems and culturally influenced IP from around the world. If you love what you do, you want to do as much of it as possible. So I figured I would start giving out some of the helpful resources that I read regularly to keep up on all things. Maybe it will inspire some people to become sherpas on the game industry as well.

Since this is the first post of this kind and I’m planning on giving away the farm, here are two great sites that are not referenced enough, and should actually cost money to visit for the info they provide:

  • Number of Android AppsAppbrain – http://www.appbrain.com/stats/ (as of this date, 1,132,053 Apps in the Android marketplace). Also check out this link to see the average price of paid apps and ratings of apps by category. It’s a phenomenal source of info.
  •  Number of iOS Games148Apps.bizhttp://148apps.biz/app-store-metrics/ (as of this date, 194,512 active games in the market and 2,236 so far this month). Jeff Scott is a great source of info on the mobile games market. I’m pretty surprised he isn’t leading R&D at Zynga making a Meg yet. Where else could you find out that the average cost of a game on iOS right now is $0.75.

More posts to come.

 

Sony recently put out more numbers on the success of the PlayStation 4 in the market so far. There are:

  • 4.2 million PlayStation 4’s were sold in 2013
  • 2 Million PlayStation Plus Accounts
  • 150 Million PlayStation Network Accounts

The high attach rate – almost 50 percent is an excellent sign of future growth for PlayStation Plus. The Instant Game Collection and ongoing free games match the offering of the Xbox Live Gold program from Microsoft. Since this generation is expensive and there are few titles available at launch, it’s going to be important for Sony to continue to offer great content on a regular basis digitally. I expect the product line-up to increase significantly in Q3-Q4 as more developers are getting development kits and middleware meets the demands of the market.

Interesting announcements from EA and Valve related to digital distribution today:

  • Steam has 75 Million users
  • Origin has 50 Million users
  • Uplay had 50 Million users (as of February 2013)

It’s important to note that in addition to PC/MAC games, EA’s Origin service and Ubisoft’s Uplay  service are also tied into their console and mobile titles,  so their 50 million user totals are not just for PC/MAC.

According to IDC’s Worldwide Digital PC and Mac Gaming 2013-2017 Forecast:

  • PC and Mac gamer spending will be $24 billion worldwide by 2017
  • Worldwide digital PC/Mac gaming is expected to grow at a rate of four percent per year
  • Market growth will occur in the BRIC (Brazil, Russia, India and China) regions
  • Hardcore F2P games have close to a $16 ARPPU, the highest of the categories studied.

ARPPU - 2014