According to the Game Publishers Association, China (GPC):

  • China had 517 million gamers as of this time last year
  • 147 million of those players are core gamers
  • There were 358 million mobile gamers in China in 2014
  • The U.S. is now the top market by revenue for mobile games

According to Global Mobile Game Confederation (GMGC):

  • China will become the largest market for mobile games in 2016 with estimated revenue of $7.7 billion
  • The U.S. will reach $7.3 billion in mobile game revenue in 2016
  • The mobile game market in China will reach $9.3 billion in 2017
  • The mobile game market in the U.S. will reach $8.2 billion in 2017

SuperData released a new report on the US digital games market. Here are the interesting points:

  • There are 287 Million Mobile Active Gamers in the U.S.
  • $1.2 Billion in U.S. digital game sales for December 2014
  • 11% Year over on year growth in December 2014, compared to December 2013
  • 17% Growth in mobile digital revenues
  • 10% Increase in console digital sales
  • 10% Decrease in social game revenues
  • Average spend on PS4 was $11.09, down from $20 in November 2014
  • Average spend on Xbox One was $6.88, down from $21 in November 2014
  • Average spend on Steam was $2.35, down from $8 in November 2014

According to a new study from Insights Meta:

  • 75 percent of players play both F2P and P2P titles
  • Less than 10% of “pay to play” gamers don’t play free-to-play games
  • 28 percent of P2P players spend money on F2P games
  • 20 percent of F2P-exclusive players spend money on F2P games
  • 36 percent of gamers surveyed said they’d downloaded free content on their console
  • 1/3 of all gaming time is spent on F2P games

The full study is available from Insights Meta. There’s also an interactive infographic if you want to check it out.

According to the new “Mobile Gaming Social Motivations” study on U.S. mobile gamers:

  • U.S. mobile gamers are typically playing more than two games per month, and spending an average of $4.58 each per month
  • Males spend $5.68 per month on average
  • Women spend $3.49 per month on average
  • Super Whales, or those that spend over $50 per month on games, spend on average about $108 per month
  • This group only constitutes 1% of the sample size, but Super Whales contribute nearly 29% to the mobile gaming revenue
  • Male U.S. mobile gamers spend almost twice as much on games monthly than female mobile gamers
  • Whales drive the bulk of revenues – 10% of players considered “High Spenders” (spending over $10 per month) make up 66 percent of the revenue from mobile gaming
  • Those playing 10 hours per week spent over 3X  the average spender in primarily strategy, combat, RPG, action and casino games
  • Mobile gamers who play primarily on iOS devices tend to spend more than their Android counterparts; however, the greatest spending and game downloading comes from mobile gamers who play on both platforms

To download the full “Mobile Gaming Social Motivations” study, goto: files.unity3d.com/everyplay/Mobile_Gaming_Social_Motivations.zip

Thanks to Niko Partners for the translation of the Gamelook.com article that stated:

  • 60-80% of players will abandon a F2P mobile game after one minute if they don’t like the gameplay or design. Here are the top reasons for abandonment:
  • 70 Percent – Monetization appears too quickly, or is overwhelming
  • 45 Percent – Difficulty/output balance
  • 34 Percent – Resources consumed too fast
  • 31 Percent – Poor initial experience
  • 28 Percent – Poor or no reward system

 

SuperDataResearch put out some recent numbers about the digital collectible card game market. Here’s the data:

The audience and revenue numbers are:

  • 53 Million Monthly Active Users (MAU) playing collectible card games ($4.1 Billion in revenue)
  • $2.8 Billion of the revenue is for physical card games (68.3 percent) and $1.3 Billion is related to digital collectible card games (31.7 percent)
  • 18 Million MAU playing collectible card games in the U.S. (1.4 Billion in revenue)
  • 2.5 Million MAU in Germany ($237 Million in revenue)
  • 2.3 Million MAU in the U.K. ($180 Million in revenue)
  • 2 Million in France ($158 Million in revenue
  • 1.8 Million in Russia ($55 Million in revenue)
  • 1.6 Million in Italy ($166 Million in revenue)
  • 1.6 Million in Spain ($154 Million in revenue)
  • 900 Thousand in Poland ($39 Million in revenue)

NOTE: Collectible card games are huge in Japan, however SuperData Research didn’t include any info for the country.

Here are a couple of other bits:

  • 12 Percent of digital collectible card game players convert to paying users in the U.S.
  • Average revenue per paying player in the U.S. is $27, again for digital collectible card games

I’m working on a small research piece regarding digital distribution and would appreciate any help from my game development friends in providing some answers. Here’s a link to a Digital Distribution Channel Survey we created: https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/MDGN6H7

I’ll definitely publish the results here on IESherpa. Any help in filling it out and sharing with your friends is appreciated.

I was looking for some data on Cost Per Install (CPI) for games in Japan and a friend of mine who runs a large studio there sent me this link, a blog post by InMobi that I missed in January. It basically sets out the relative cost of mobile installs worldwide. While it isn’t exclusive to games, we can use it to decipher regional costs. To get started, I went over to one of my favorite CPI sites, MobPartner, to check out their scrolling list of live CPI transactions. If you like to watch CPI bidding, it’s the best place to watch the action. Here are a couple pics to illustrate the CPIs today:

CCSE4KE4K UK

As you can see, Empire: Four Kingdoms is buying a lot of installs and they are ranging in the U.S. between $1.90 and $2.40 and hitting $3.05 in the U.K. I would guess the higher priced acquisition in the U.S. is on a better performing network, or more proven ad channel that provides players that either convert a bit higher, or have a higher Lifetime Value (LTV). You need to balance cost with volume in any acquisition campaign, but that’s probably obvious.

So now let’s dig into the InMobi data. We know that their numbers are not just games, so we need to create a reference point.

U.K. 174 $3.31 3.05
U.S. 100 $1.90 $1.75
       
160.5      

The 174 is a number from InMobi on the relative cost per install in the U.K. related to the U.S. Since we know what Goodgame Studios is paying for their users we know the numbers in bold to be true. The InMobi numbers don’t quite match up yet. The difference is 160.5 instead of 174, which is roughly 92.2 percent of the difference. I broke down the numbers with the Relative CPI (R CPI), the Adjusted Relative CPI (AR CPI) and came up with the Actual Game CPI (AG CPI) below. It looks about right to me in terms of acquisition costs. I hope it’s helpful for you too.

Country R CPI AR CPI AG CPI
U.K. 174 160  $  3.05
Australia 127 117  $  2.22
U.S. 100 92  $  1.90
New Zealand 95 88  $  1.66
Malaysia 87 80  $  1.52
South Korea 84 77  $  1.47
Vietnam 84 77  $  1.47
Japan 81 75  $  1.42
Hong Kong 77 71  $  1.35
France 75 69  $  1.31
Singapore 71 65  $  1.24
China 60 55  $  1.05
Germany 56 52  $  0.98
India 40 37  $  0.70